Saturday, January 28, 2006

January 28

Correctional officer Jeffery Alan Wroten, shot in the face by an inmate, has died.

The Sun has more bullet points on the Central Booking recommendations.

William English, 24, got 15 years for firearm possession.

A former Baltimore firefighter, Carl Kus, got two years for bringing 150 pounds of pot up from Texas.

The good news: the Department of Juvenile Services has a ten-year plan to build detention centers. The bad news: construction won't start until 2011, there'll be fewer beds than before and there may not be enough money in the budget to actually make the plan happen.

Robert Smith of Aberdeen was arrested for impersonating an EMT.

10 comments:

John Galt said...

Interesting that 2005 Balto. County homicides are up to 40 from 29 the previous year.

What percentage do you guess have a connection to Baltimore City?

Maybe now the county taxpayers will call for the State to intercede about the criminal infestation within city limits. See, it's not just a city problem. It travels, too.

Anonymous said...

Did anyone see my blog on Jan. 26? I'm still wondering where a decision to pour millions of dollars into the syncronization of traffic lights prevails over using that money for increasing our police force.

Maggie

Anonymous said...

Mr. Galt,

Explain to me what you mean by Baltimore B?
Thanks,
Maggie

The Cybrarian said...

Maggie, you could ask that about a lot of things. Maryland has a projected $1 billion surplus-- why is Central Booking at 135% capacity with no one in charge? The city has a budget surplus too. It's not a money thing. There's simply no excuse for not having enough police. Literally-- we have yet to hear an excuse. Hamm doesn't appear believe there's a problem.

Anonymous said...

I see Mr. Death's Cyrarian. Thanks for the reply, it help's me see things more clearly. I moved here from a small town up North in PA, I also lived 15 years in Phila. Pa and was never really that concerned with such issues, but since moving to the city of Baltimore I've become very concerned. I realize my thoughts, and concerns are not always perfectly articulated but I'm learning. I really care, and want to make a differance, this city needs to make huge changes, so huge that it seems almost impossible. What are your thought's on that, the impossiblty of making changes. Did you happen to read The Tipping Point by:Malcolm Gladwell?

Maggie

Maggie

John Galt said...

Maggie,

Baltimore is a dichotomous city. You will find upwardly-mobile professional and creative upper-middle class folks with excessive educational backgrounds, intentionally healthful lifestyles, and exemplary personal conduct as a routine. These have attractive income characteristics and spend their income on well-appointed housing and upscale amenities. They tend to be left of center and greatly desire to be (perceived as) multicultural and diversity-friendly. They are generally white or pink collar and many seem to occupy executive positions within nonprofits or the public sector. This is Baltimore A. Typical of it are Federal Hill, upper and eastern Hampden, Canton, Downtown luxury Condo complexes, waterfront Fells Point, and Lauraville. Residents patronize the Walters, the Flower Mart, Donna's cafes, and Whole Foods or Wegman's.

Then there's Baltimore B. These folks are either working poor or on public support. Many dropped out of high school. Those who didn't generally wouldn't perform well on standardized achievement tests. These folks eat a lot of fried, salty foods, and have high blood pressure, bad cholesterol, and incipient diabetes. Roughly a majority of nonsenior nonchildren regularly use illegal drugs. If they haven't been to jail, they certainly have enough relatives/associates who have to be very familiar with courts and bail bondsmen. Their incomes are limited, often without meaningful savings. While they are prone to impulse purchases and lottery tickets, their homes are usually modest and strictly functional. They either work in the service sector or for government as cogs in the wheel. Many have rapid job turnover. Others are accumulating service years for pension. Corresponding neighborhoods might include Sharp/Leadenhall, Remington or Pigtown, Sandtown-Winchester's Nehemiah housing, Cherry Hill's infamous housing projects, and Park Heights. The might go to a club on Friday night, see a stepper troupe at a free but modest neighborhood street fair, grab some fried food at a corner carryout or Lexington Market, and shop where staple foods are inexpensive and the independence card is accepted.

They roughly, but not rigorously, correspond to the city's map of racial patterns and the members of one interact rarely with members of the other. Their social networks are pretty mutually exclusive, except for mandatory tasks. The two also exhibit their own symbolic repertoires, making informal communication between the two uncomfortable, if not indeed impossible.

Anonymous said...

Thank-you Mr. Galt, is it that extreme though? I guess you are speaking as a majority. I would think there are also a few blue collars in Balti. B. What is a pink collar, and a short answer will do ;)

Maggie

Anonymous said...

I meant to say blue collars in Balti. A.
Maggie

John Galt said...

You're starting to see that I have a big mouth. Yes, there are blue collars in Balto. A, but few. There are fewer manufacturing operations each year to employ the salt of the earth. They getting priced out by O'Malley's gentrification. The result is that you're paying three times as much to live in a place that's 10% better. Take a look at the exodus from Canton and Hampden. Blue collars vote with their feet. Those who owned homes have taken the higher prices and run with the cash.

Pink collar refers to middle-income service jobs traditionally filkled by women: nurses, secretaries, flight attendants, etc.

Anonymous said...

Bleh. "Professional and creative" "exemplary personal conduct" vs. "eat a lot of fried food" "have enough relatives/associates who have to be very familiar with courts and bail bondsmen". Nobody else had anything to say about this bs? --Kevin